Buy MORE Save MORE!

Seafood

Beef

Pasta

Chicken

Veggie

Pork

Dessert

More than 150 of Free Recipes & Cooking Tips

Buy E-Gift Card and Save 10% Instantly

About us

Spice Types, Uses

Contact Us

Become an ambassador

List of products

Summer Spices

Become an ambassador to take advantage of the gifts, discount codes, earn affiliate commissions and more!

This section doesn’t currently include any content. Add content to this section using the sidebar.

Image caption appears here

Add your deal, information or promotional text

This section doesn’t currently include any content. Add content to this section using the sidebar.

Image caption appears here

Become an ambassador to take advantage of the gifts, discount codes, earn affiliate commissions and more.

This section doesn’t currently include any content. Add content to this section using the sidebar.

Image caption appears here

Add your deal, information or promotional text

Bay Leaf Source

At iSpice, we know that healthy eating is a journey. We’re here to support you with a wide variety of seasonings made with the finest, healthiest herbs and spices in the world.

Our Wellness and World Flavors collections are crafted to inspire delicious, better-for-you meals cooked at home. Whether you’re looking for healthy alternatives, bold flavors from around the globe, or both, iSpice is your one-stop-shop for the ultimate, versatile seasoning blends. The best part? We’ve taken all the guesswork out of knowing how to season your food the healthy way.

Leaf of the lovely bay tree (Laurus Nobili's), an evergreen of the Lauraceae family, native to nations surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. Bay leaf, also known as laurel leaf, has a subtle scent. They have a harsh taste and are often used to flavor pickles, marinades, stuffing's, and seafood.

Cineole, the oil's primary constituent, makes up around 2% of the total oil content. It is common to cook with dried bay leaves intact before removing them from the dish; however, powdered bay leaves may also be purchased. The ancient Greeks used its leaves to make laurel wreaths to reward their triumphant athletes, growing it ever since. In the middle Ages, bay leaves were employed to treat various ailments. 

There is no solid scientific evidence to support the use of bay leaf for diabetes, cancer, stomach disorders, pain, and many other illnesses. The antifungal qualities of the bay leaf are effective in treating fungus. Together with its high vitamin C concentration, these characteristics may help protect the skin from any form of infection or irritability.  It's also possible that swallowing the whole bay leaf is harmful. However, you can't get around the fact that bay leaves are essential.

Soups, stews, brines, and sauces for anything from meat and fish to vegetables are among their many uses. The leaves also flavor many traditional French and Italian recipes. Bay leaves are also used in long-cooking meals like soups, stews, and braises, but they may also be used in risottos, pasta sauces, and even a basic pot of rice to bring out the flavor.

To get the process started, you need at least a tiny amount of liquid in the bay to infuse and heat. A single bay leaf may make a significant difference. In general, it's preferable not to use more than 2 or 3 leaves per serving of whatever you're preparing. The fundamental tastes of your cuisine might easily be overpowered if you go overboard with the seasonings and spices. 

Since it was one of the first and most frequently traded spices, the bay has become an established condiment in many cuisines throughout the globe.

Adding bay leaves to meals daily might also positively affect one's overall health. Migraine sufferers have found them to be helpful. It is also used to ease indigestion; bay leaves contain enzymes that break down proteins and speed up food digestion.

What is the difference when it comes to fresh and dried bay leaves? 

Fresh Bay leaf:

The underside of fresh bay leaves is a darker shade of green than the top.

The cost of fresh bay leaves may be prohibitive, and they don't stay as long as dried ones.

Using too many fresh leaves in a dish may be overbearing and must be discarded early in the cooking process.

Dried Bay Leaf:

Much of the color's brightness is lost after it is dried. Dried bay leaves may be kept in the dish while it's cooking and then removed before serving for a milder flavor. Freshly dried bay leaves cannot be substituted since they lose their flavor and perfume over time.

Search